Nature

Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This Montezuma Oropendola was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


Costa Rica Monkeys

Costa Rica Monkeys. Capuchin monkeys, also called white-faced monkeys, occupy the wet lowland forests on Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and Panama and deciduous dry forest on the Pacific coast. Capuchins live from northern Colombia to Belize; in Costa Rica and Panama they can live in habitats up to 1,500 m in elevation; they may live as high as 2,000 m in Colombia. Among the best known monkeys, the white-headed Capuchin is recognized as the typical companion to the organ grinder. It is a highly intelligent monkey and has been trained to assist paraplegic persons. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Inspiration Georg C Lichtenberg

Georg Christoph Lichtenberg was a German scientist, satirist, and Anglophile. As a scientist, he was the first to hold a professorship explicitly dedicated to experimental physics in Germany. http://www.encyclopedia.com/topic/Georg_Christoph_Lichtenberg.aspx


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Inspiration Aristotle

Aristotle is a towering figure in ancient Greek philosophy, making contributions to logic, metaphysics, mathematics, physics, biology, botany, ethics, politics, agriculture, medicine, dance and theatre. He was a student of Plato who in turn studied under Socrates. He was more empirically-minded than Plato or Socrates and is famous for rejecting Plato’s theory of forms. As a prolific writer and polymath, Aristotle radically transformed most, if not all, areas of knowledge he touched. It is no wonder that Aquinas referred to him simply as “The Philosopher.” In his lifetime, Aristotle wrote as many as 200 treatises, of which only 31 survive. Unfortunately for us, these works are in the form of lecture notes and draft manuscripts never intended for general readership, so they do not demonstrate his reputed polished prose style which attracted many great followers, including the Roman Cicero. Aristotle was the first to classify areas of human knowledge into distinct disciplines such as mathematics, biology, and ethics. Some of these classifications are still used today. As the father of the field of logic, he was the first to develop a formalized system for reasoning. Aristotle observed that the validity of any argument can be determined by its structure rather than its content. Aristotle’s philosophies share common ground with many of the key aspects of design thinking.


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Inspiration Bern Williams

Sir Bernard Arthur Owen Williams was an English moral philosopher, described by The Times as the "most brilliant and most important British moral philosopher of his time." http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/williams-bernard/


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Inspiration Leonardo DaVinci

Inspiration Leonardo da Vinci. Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) is one of the most intriguing personalities in the history of Western art. Trained in Florence as a painter and sculptor in the workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio (1435–1488), Leonardo is also celebrated for his scientific contributions. Leonardo's curiosity and insatiable hunger for knowledge never left him. He was constantly observing, experimenting, and inventing, and drawing was, for him, a tool for recording his investigation of nature. He was principally active in Florence (1472–ca. 1482, 1500–1508) and Milan (ca. 1482–99, 1508–13), but spent the last years of his life in Rome (1513–16) and France (1516/17–1519), where he died. His genius as an artist and inventor continues to inspire artists and scientists alike centuries after his death. http://www.leonardoda-vinci.org/biography.html


Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This bird was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


Inspiration Aristotle

Aristotle is a towering figure in ancient Greek philosophy, making contributions to logic, metaphysics, mathematics, physics, biology, botany, ethics, politics, agriculture, medicine, dance and theatre. He was a student of Plato who in turn studied under Socrates. He was more empirically-minded than Plato or Socrates and is famous for rejecting Plato’s theory of forms. As a prolific writer and polymath, Aristotle radically transformed most, if not all, areas of knowledge he touched. It is no wonder that Aquinas referred to him simply as “The Philosopher.” In his lifetime, Aristotle wrote as many as 200 treatises, of which only 31 survive. Unfortunately for us, these works are in the form of lecture notes and draft manuscripts never intended for general readership, so they do not demonstrate his reputed polished prose style which attracted many great followers, including the Roman Cicero. Aristotle was the first to classify areas of human knowledge into distinct disciplines such as mathematics, biology, and ethics. Some of these classifications are still used today. As the father of the field of logic, he was the first to develop a formalized system for reasoning. Aristotle observed that the validity of any argument can be determined by its structure rather than its content. Aristotle’s philosophies share common ground with many of the key aspects of design thinking.


Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This Montezuma Oropendola was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


More items
Design Ideation | Inspiration By Design.
324 S Main St. Stillwater, MN 55082 :: Established 2007