Inspiration

Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This Montezuma Oropendola was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This Montezuma Oropendola was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Inspiration Anne Wilson Schaef

Anne Wilson Schaef has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and an honorary doctorate in Human Letters from Kenyon College in Kenyon, Ohio. After practicing for many years, she left the field of psychology and psychotherapy in 1984. She has developed her own approach to healing the whole person, which comes out of the ancient teachings of her ancestors, which she calls Living in Process. Living in Process works with recovery from the addictive process moving beyond to wholeness of body, mind, and spirit. In the last twenty years, she has taught this approach to healing throughout the world, and is internationally respected as a speaker, consultant, and seminar leader. For the last 20 years, she has worked intensively with addictions — both ingestive addictions (alcohol, food, drugs, etc.) and process addictions (work, gambling, sex, relationships, etc.) http://www.livinginprocess.com/anne-wilson-schaef.php


Inspiration Ronald Reagan

Ronald Wilson Reagan was an American actor and politician. He was the 40th President of the United States. Prior to his presidency, he served as the 33rd Governor of California. http://www.biography.com/people/ronald-reagan-9453198


Inspiration Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the Transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of Transcendentalism in his 1836 essay, Nature. Following this ground-breaking work, he gave a speech entitled "The American Scholar" in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. considered to be America's "Intellectual Declaration of Independence" http://www.biography.com/people/ralph-waldo-emerson-9287153


Inspiration Napoleon Hill

Napoleon Hill was an American author in the area of the new thought movement who was one of the earliest producers of the modern genre of personal-success literature. He is widely considered to be one of the great writers on success. http://napoleonhill.wwwhubs.com/


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Inspiration Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Christian philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. http://www.biography.com/people/blaise-pascal-9434176


Inspiration Charles Morgan

Charles Langbridge Morgan was an English-born playwright and novelist of English and Welsh parentage. The main themes of his work were, as he himself put it, "Art, Love, and Death", and the relation between them.


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