Yearly Archives: 2015

Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This Montezuma Oropendola was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


Monkeys of Central America

Monkeys of Central America. Saimiri, or Squirrel monkeys make their homes in tropical evergreen forests, mangroves, and secondary forests. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. The extremely sociable, Saimiri, keep in groups which vary widely in size depending on the carrying capacity of their habitat: some troops are as small as 7 to 8, and others as large as 100 (these have been sighted in the Amazon basin). Several adult males will join in a single troop, and there are usually four adult females for every male. Females will have a single baby at a time after a 165-day gestation period. This diurnal monkey has the most restricted range of Costa Rican primates, although it is very similar to and may be same species as Saimiri sciureus, another squirrel monkey which lives in Amazonian portions of Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Venezuela, and Guyanas. In Costa Rica, squirrel monkeys are threatened because of increased rates and amounts of deforestation and forest fragmentation. This monkey was photographed by Design Ideation near Manuel Antonio National Park and Quepos, Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study.


Birds of Costa Rica

Birds of Costa Rica. Most of us see birds as a symbol of freedom, or even as symbols of the future. Their ability to soar high into the sky and their proximity with the sky makes them desirable for humans who cannot fly without substitute wings. From time immemorial, mankind has considered birds to be signs of eternal life. Many stories and folklore suggest that birds were taken as signs of renewed life, often as a transition between life and death. Many even consider them to be an idea or proposal for the future. This Montezuma Oropendola was photographed by Design Ideation near the Arenal Volcano, in Costa Rica as part of an animal behavior research study. Arenal Volcano, in Spanish Volcán Arenal, is an active andesitic stratovolcano in north-western Costa Rica around 90 km northwest of San José, in the province of Alajuela, canton of San Carlos, and district of La Fortuna. http://www.pbase.com/dadas115/birds_of_costa_rica&page=all


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